Free Library of Many of the World’s Great Classics, Formatted for Easy Reading


Click Here to read all these works.


Read Our Introduction, Following the List of Works


Immediate help for all slow, average, and good readers.


Also, specific help for all those challenged with Macular Degeneration, Dyslexia, ADHD, ESL, Brain Trauma, Autism, Dementia, Spinal Injury, and many other physical and mental challenges.


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Current List of Classics,

Formatted for Easy Reading (72)


The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll


Aesop’s Fables


Anna Karenina by Fyodor Dostoevsky


The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin


Beowulf


The Bible KJV


The Call of the Wild by Jack London


The Count of Monte Christo by Alexandre Dumas


Daniel Deronda by George Eliot


David Copperfield by Charles Dickens


Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol


The Declaration of Independence


The Diary of a Nobody by George Grossmith


A Doll’s House by Henrik Isben


Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes


Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson


Dubliners by James Joyce


Emma by Jane Austen


Fairy Tales V.1 and V.2 by H. C. Anderson


Father Goriot by Honore de Balzac


Faust by Goethe


Frankenstein by Mary Shelly


Great Expectations by Charles Dickens


Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift


Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain


Hunger by Knut Hamsun


The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky


The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde


In Search of Lost Time V1 by Marcel Proust


Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte


Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy


Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman


Little Women by Louisa M. Alcott


Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert


Medea by Euripides


Middlemarch by George Eliot


Moby Dick by Herman Melville


Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas


Nightmare Abbey by Thomas Love Peacock


Nostromo by Joseph Conrad


The Odyssey by Homer


The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde


Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan


Portrait of a Lady by Henry James


Portrait of an Artist by James Joyce


Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen


The Rainbow by D. H. Lawrence


The Raven by E. A. Poe


The Red and the Black by Stendhal


The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane


The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers


Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe


The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne


Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle


Short Stories by Bret Harte


Siddhartha by Herman Hesse


Silas Marner by George Eliot


Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence


Summer by Edith Wharton


Sybl by Benjamin Disraeli


A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens


The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan


Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome


Tom Jones by Henry Fielding


Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne


Ulysses by James Joyce


Uncle Remus by Joel Chandler Harris


Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe


Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray


Walden by Henry David Thoreau


The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope


The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame


The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins


Wuthering Heights by Emile Bronte



Introduction To These Classics


    This is an expanding group of many of the most famous novels,

plays,

short stories,

and poems of all time.


Download just the ones you want,

as you read them,

or download the entire collection.


This collection of works is absolutely free to anyone who wants it.


These books are presented in English.


They are specially prepared for easy reading.


    No word in these classics has been changed from the original.


However,

formatting and pagination have been changed.


Also,

there is the option of interactive,

computer-voice assistance at adjustable speed.


(This article is formatted in this new way.)


     Example of Formatted Novel


    Anybody can immediately see the value of this approach by comparing the first two paragraphs of "A Tale of Two Cities" presented normally,

and then in the new format.


You will immediately perceive the logic,

poetry,

and music of prose,

formatted by this new approach.


It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way-- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.


There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.


   It was the best of times,

it was the worst of times,

it was the age of wisdom,

it was the age of foolishness,

it was the epoch of belief,

it was the epoch of incredulity,

it was the season of Light,

it was the season of Darkness,

it was the spring of hope,

it was the winter of despair,

we had everything before us,

we had nothing before us,

we were all going direct to Heaven,

we were all going direct the other way -- in short,

the period was so far like the present period,

that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received,

for good or for evil,

in the superlative degree of comparison only.


   There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face,

on the throne of England;


there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face,

on the throne of France.


In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes,

that things in general were settled for ever.


   Recommended Approach


   The recommended approach is to combine improved formatting and pagination with interactive,

computer-voice,

reading just ahead of the sound,

and pausing at the punctuation marks for the sound to catch up,

and to think about what you have just read.


Focus on improving comprehension first,

then increase speed gradually,

up to 550 words per minute,

using the speech rate as a pacer.


Each of these three subjects is discussed in greater detail later in this article.


   Goal


    The goal of this approach is to instantly make reading far more successful and far more enjoyable for all readers at all levels and at all ages.


The idea of this reading approach is to proceed at all times exactly as fast as your mind thinks,

without anxiety,

without being overwhelmed by too much text at a time,

and with excellent comprehension,

great recall,

and high enjoyment.


Students set the controls (described below) to maximize their own experience at their current level,

and then advance upwards.


There is a separate formatting and reading approach for each level,

up to 550 words per minute and above.


The goal is to make reading so enjoyable and successful that reading will be the activity of choice,

over alternatives.


This approach also teaches transferrable skills for reading traditional text.


You will improve your ability to read well as you read these works.


    Who Can Benefit From This Approach?


    Absolutely everybody in any K-12 school,

or college,

or above can use this approach to improve their reading and increase their reading enjoyment.


Additionally,

this approach simultaneously helps students with listening,

focus,

recall,

visualization,

memory,

writing,

thinking,

and speaking.


Average and good readers can make immediate progress in both speed and comprehension.


Troubled readers and ESL students can read at grade level.


Severely challenged readers,

elementary students,

and adult beginners can master decoding,

automaticity and fluency,

and then move up.


Also,

everybody with an iPhone,

or iPad,

or iPad mini,

or iPad touch can now read on the go.


This library is the first time books have been properly formatted for easy reading on an iOS device;


i.e. by punctuation interval in large font.


    Range of Material


    Any novel,

or textbook,

or Internet article can be almost instantly formatted to read with this approach.


    Location of These Books


   These files are in a Dropbox folder,

which we invite you to link to on any iOS device,

Mac,

PC,

or smartphone.


Just click the link at the top of the list of books at the bottom of this page.


You do not even need a free Dropbox account.


    What Does PR Stand For?


    PR stands for Proportional Reading,

which is the name of the formatting software used here,

and the name of this reading improvement approach.


    Type of Article


    These stories are presented as .html articles,

which you read with your browser.


    On or Offline


    Any .html file can be downloaded,

or starred as a favorite on Dropbox,

and then read anywhere,

with or without the Internet or Wi-Fi.


This feature is ideal for reading on busses and trains,

in waiting rooms,

and outside.


    Approach to Formatting


    This is a High-Tech way to read based on your experiencing more enjoyment,

better comprehension and faster speed,

up to 550 words per minute and above.


Our main presentation format used in this collection (called PR3) immediately reduces reading anxiety and instantly shows the logic,

poetry,

and music of prose within each sentence and paragraph.


Students are also able,

often for the first time,

to read text a punctuation interval at a time,

at increasing speed.


A “punctuation interval” is all the words from the beginning of a sentence to the first comma,

or semi-colon,

and then so on to the end of the sentence.


These formatting changes make reading texts much easier for all readers,

at all levels,

and at all ages.


In order to help people at all levels,

we actually have a progression of 4 separate formatting styles.


Students pick the formatting style that is right for where they are at,

and then progress up.


Our formatting styles progress from presenting a word at a time,

to a phrase at a time,

to presenting a punctuation interval at a time,

to presenting a sentence at a time.


(This article is written by punctuation interval.)


In all formats,

paragraphs and sentences are separated by a blank line.


Paragraphs are also indented at the beginning.


Semi-colons are treated as sentences.


    1. The designation PR1 means formatted by word,

center justified,

and optionally in a narrow window showing just one word at a time.


No eye movement is required.


Students can proceed manually with proportional presentation,

staying longer on the longer words,

(just as if they were spoken),

and pausing at the punctuation marks.


They can instantly stop to think,

back up,

or look up words.


They can also proceed automatically at a choice of several speeds,

pausing instantly as desired.


Overcome subvocalization right now,

for free,

using this formatting approach,

which we developed,

and have been teaching for over fifteen years.


    2. The designation PR2 means formatted by phrase,

one phrase per line,

with a blank line between sentences.


    3. The designation PR3 means formatted by punctuation interval,

with a blank line between sentences.


    4. The designation PR4 means formatted by sentence.


    Approach to Pagination


    The background color of each page has been darkened so the overall screen brightness is much less.


By doing this,

the relative contrast between the foreground (type color) and background is also reduced.


Both of these changes greatly reduce the tendency to fall asleep while reading.


These settings make it easy to read in bed at night without the lights on,

by turning down the overall brightness level.


You should frequently adjust the brightness of the screen for the brightness of the room;


brighter in the midday and darker at night.


Otherwise,

you will quickly fall asleep.


Do not read with a bright light or a window in view,

or this will also quickly put you to sleep.


    Approach on Voice Assistance


    In addition to changing formatting and pagination,

we provide the option of interactive,

computer-voice.


Speed of the sound is adjustable from below normal reading speed (150 wpm) to 350 wpm,

and then up to 550 wpm.


Note: Text to Speech is called VoiceOver by Apple.


    a) Using Sound or Not


   You can read these formatted novels and other works with or without sound assistance.


If you do not want to use sound assistance,

you can easily read them on any PC or Mac,

or iPhone,

or other smartphone.


If you want to use sound assistance (which is recommended),

you need to use an iOS device,

or Mac laptop or Mac desktop and the Safaris browser,

ideally with an (extended) keyboard.


Almost every student in America already owns,

or has access to,

one of these Apple devices.


Please note: the software for reading text with interactive,

computer-voice,

at adjustable speed,

and with the option of instant repeat,

already exists for free on all iOS devices,

Mac laptops,

and Mac desktops.


Students and adults just need to learn how to use what they already possess.


Contact us for 1-on-1 help on how to use interactive, computer-voice to read these works.


E-mail: proread@tiac.net, Call: 978-927-9234


The extended keyboard can be wired or Bluetooth.


Reading with sound works best if the screen is at the ideal height and distance,

and the keyboard is at a separate ideal height and distance.


    b) Manual or Automatic Progression


    Normally the sound stops at the end of each highlighted punctuation interval for you to think as much as you want before proceeding.


At this time you can also repeat the sound of that selection as often as desired before advancing,

or look up definitions.


This is called manual mode.


Alternatively,

you can have the text run automatically from one section of highlighted text to the next,

pausing whenever you want and for as long as you want.


This is called automatic mode.


   As you read,

you can instantly switch from automatic to manual mode,

or back.


If you are using a Mac laptop or desktop,

you can easily read automatically,

pausing whenever desired,

and pressing the page down key when you get to the bottom of the screen.


To pause in automatic mode,

just press the control key,

but you must do so while the sound is playing.


   When in pause,

you can repeat the sound of that section of text as often as you want,

or look up definitions.


Note: To read on an iPhone with VoiceOver,

it is often easier to use screen commands,

rather than a Bluetooth keyboard,

reading manually,

down from the top of the screen.


Also,

text will be much larger if you hold your iOS device horizontally (landscape orientation).


    c) Switching Between Modes


    Most of these novels and other works will ideally be read in automatic mode with optional pausing.


Textbooks,

philosophy,

and legal works are best read manually,

at least the first time through.


In addition,

all decoding,

automaticity and fluency practice is done with manual mode.


    d) Keeping Voice Over Controls Active After Turning Sound Off


    You can control the text with the VoiceOver commands,

yet have the voice itself turned off.


This is a faster way to progress on an iPad (when reading without sound),

than repeatedly touching the screen.


    e) Turning the Page


    It is best to read down from the top of a screen of text,

rather than have text added to the bottom of the page,

line by line.


This latter approach will quickly put you to sleep from the hypnotic effect of moving text.


When you get to the bottom of the text on a page,

press the "page down" key to move to the top of the next screen of text.


On a Bluetooth keyboard you do this by pressing "option and down arrow".


On a laptop keyboard you do this by pressing "function and down arrow".


Also,

if you are reading a whole section of text out loud before hearing the sound,

you will have to read down from the top of the screen.


This would most often be done by elementary students,

or ESL students at a beginning level,

or remedial or severely challenged readers.


This specific approach is ideal for teaching decoding,

automaticity,

and fluency.


    f) Sound Volume and Delivery


    The sound volume can be adjusted,

and you can use speakers or earphones.


Earphones greatly increase focus and concentration.


    g) Speech Rate


    The rate of speech can be adjusted to that which works best for you.


It can be changed instantly as you advance,

or if material becomes more difficult.


By adjusting the amount of text highlighted at a time and how you choose to read this text with interactive sound,

absolutely everybody K-12 can improve their reading proficiency and enjoyment.


    h) Choose How to Use the Sound Assistance (5 Different Approaches):


    In addition to just listening to text read out loud,

without looking at the text,

which is ideal for blind people,

driving in the car,

and doing the dishes,

in our approach there are FIVE very different ways to use sound interactively with text,

as you read the text.


    Different Uses for Each Format


    Each of these five approaches has a different best use.


Students advance upwards as they improve.


Each approach is described below.


1. Average and good readers should read ahead of the sound,

pausing briefly on the longer words,

and pausing at the punctuation points for the sound to catch up.


Repeat each highlighted section as often as necessary before advancing.


Increase the speech rate as you improve,

up to 550 wpm.


The sound acts as an adjustable pacer.


Have the voice and text proceed automatically or manually,

depending on the difficulty of the text.


    2. Remedial readers and those just starting off with interactive sound  should read manually with the sound,

at reading aloud speed,

about 150 wpm.


    3. Elementary and ESL students practice by trying to read out loud before hearing the sound,

proceeding manually.


    4. Severely challenged readers read by phrases,

reading out loud before pressing to hear the sound.


Alternatively,

they can hear the phrase read out loud and then go through the highlighted phrase a word at a time,

hearing each word as often as necessary,

and then repeat the phrase clearly and smoothly before proceeding to the next phrase.


If they do not want the initial clue,

they can just proceed through any highlighted section a word at a time.


    5. Students with severe Dyslexia, wondering eye, Macular Degeneration, or initial recovery from brain trauma can read one word on a line at a time,

center justified,

manually,

or automatically,

at different speeds,

pausing instantly as needed.


   Value of Free Collection


    This collection includes over 70 different volumes of the works most often chosen by K-12 schools and colleges for students to read.


The value of this collection is well over $500.00 per student,

or adult,

just in terms of saved costs of printed books.


This is effectively a free donation to any school district in the USA,

or anywhere else in the world,

of over $500,000.00 per 1,000 students,

on a repeating basis.


In addition,

Special Ed students will not have to be sent out of district to very expensive schools,

saving at least another $100,000.00 a year per school district.


Finally,

all subject teachers and Sped teachers can start to far better use their time.


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